Retro Gaming and Computers Exhibition, May 2018

April 30, 2018 · 0 comments

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As part of SA’s History Festival in May 2018, the Berri Library has an exhibition of some great old gaming machines and computers from the past. What did we game on back then? Relive the gaming and computers of the 1970s and 80s, the start of technology, with a look at a variety of games and computers from that era.

Computers in the display have been kindly loaned to us by some older tech heads!  Come in and check out these mean machines (and some of them are working!).

If arcade gaming is more your style, come and play our coffee table style 2 player arcade machine or our upright arcade machine. Both of these are on ‘free play’ and the 2 player machine has more than 60 great games of the past ready to play – like 1942, Frogger, Space Invaders etc!  These machines have been kindly loaned to us by Ron Haynes of Monash.

More information about the Computers in our Display

Acorn A3000

Acorn A3000

Acorn A3000 Personal Computer, also called the BBC Acorn Archimedes was released in 1987 and was used in education environments. This one still works and is on loan from Rob Boyd.  Click here to find out more about the Acorn A3000.

Apple IIe

Apple IIe

Apple IIe Personal Computer was released in 1983 and was heavily used in education environments. This one is working for the display and is on loan from Rob Boyd. Click here to find out more about the Apple IIe.

Atari 2600

Atari 2600 Console

Atari 2600 Game Console was released in 1977. This one still works and is on loan from Rob Boyd. Click here to find out more about the Atari 2600.

Atari 520ST

Atari 520ST

Atari 520ST Personal Computer was released in 1985 and used the popular Motorola 68000 chip, also used by the Commodore Amiga at this time. This one is working for the display and is on loan from Jeremy & Peter Ison. Click here to find out more about the Atari 520ST.

Canon X-07 Handheld

Canon X-07 Handheld

Canon X-07 Handheld Computer was released in 1983. This one still works and is on loan from Peter Ison. Click here to find out more about the Canon X-07 Handheld Computer.

Amiga 1000

Amiga 1000

Commodore Amiga 1000 Personal Computer was released in 1985 and used the popular 16 bit Motorola 68000 chip, also used in the Atari ST range of computers. This one is working for the display and is on loan from Ron Haynes. Click here to find out more about the Commodore Amiga 1000 Personal Computer.

Amig 1200

Amiga 1200

Commodore Amiga 1200 Personal Computer was released in 1992 and was the final Amiga before Commodore folded. This one is working for the display and is on loan from Ron Haynes. Click here to find out more about the Commodore Amiga 1200 Personal Computer.

C-64

C-64

Commodore C-64 Personal Computer was released in 1982 and is the biggest selling computer of all time. This one is working for the display and is on loan from Rob Boyd. Click here to find out more about the Commodore C-64.

Dick Smith Wizzard

Dick Smith Wizzard

Dick Smith Wizzard Hybrid Gaming/Personal Computer was released in 1982. This one still works and is on loan from Rob Boyd.Click here to find out more about the Dick Smith Wizzard.

Dick Smith Z-80

Dick Smith Z-80

Dick Smith z-80/TRS-80 was released in 1981 and could be purchased in kit form. The home built z-80 (black) no longer works and is on loan from Ron Haynes but the other one (white) still runs and is on loan from Rob Boyd. Click here to find out more about the TRS-80.


Some interesting facts about the Computers in our Display

  • The Commodore C-64 is the best selling personal computer in history.
  • AmigaBASIC, an early Amiga programming language was actually written by a small company called Microsoft.
  • The Atari ST was the first home computer to feature integrated MIDI support and because of this unique feature, it was used by professional musicians.
  • The Commodore SX-64 was the first ever portable colour computer.

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